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Crye Precision G3 Combat Shirt and Pants

9/8/11 - The G3 Combat Shirt and Pants are the follow-on to Crye Precision's Combat Shirt and Pant AC, previously reviewed. More of an evolution than a complete design change, the G3 Combat uniform has detail changes that allow it to offer more utility and mobility than before.

Crye pioneered the concept of the combat shirt that spawned so many imitators. The Combat shirt with a light weight torso mated to BDU sleeves is fast becoming the accepted standard for wear with body armour. Many variations of the concept abound, with different torso or sleeve materials (some FR, some not, some designed for inclement weather etc), but the common factor is the use of a lighter weight torso without pockets and a more hard-wearing fabric for the sleeves. Crye's Combat Pant is more complex to manufacture that there have been fewer imitators of that particular garment, and none with the amount of unique, built-in features.

G3 Combat Shirt

When wearing body armour, a vest or chest rig, access to torso pockets is limited and normal BDU sizing tends to be on the looser side, causing bunching of excess material under the armour or gear. The Combat Shirt concept eliminates the torso pockets and bulk, instead replacing the entire torso with a light weight wicking material that provides the most comfort when worn under gear. The upper arm pockets provide storage while the integrated elbow pads offer greater protection with less weight than separate elbow pads.

Here's a summary of the features on the G3 Combat Shirt, and differences between the G3 and AC. Size medium/regular is shown below:

  • Material - The G3 Combat Shirt torso utilizes enhanced flame-resistant (FR) X-static driFIRE modacrylic fabric for the torso, and it's now a khaki colour vs the light tan heather on the AC. The darker colour matches the MultiCam sleeves better and presents less of a colour contrast than before. driFIRE uses X-static technology which is a fiber made of 99.9% pure silver permamently bonded to the surface of the textile fiber to provide anti-microbial and anti-static properties. While polyester/nylon-based garments will melt or drip when exposed to flame, driFIRE will not. It's not a flame-resistant treatment - the properties are inherent in the fabric and will not deteriorate over time. The sleeves and collar are made of Crye's Mil-Spec 50/50 NYCO ripstop fabric. Also shown below is Crye's new Khaki 400 colour; it's less yellowish than the previous sand coloured fabric on the AC. The G3 has a printed tag on the lower torso instead of the sewn-on tag on the AC.


MultiCam




Khaki 400

  • High, zipper collar - this can be worn up or folded over, open or closed. It's purposely made tall in the rear (4") to protect the neck from slings, straps or hot brass. I normally wear it folded over in half, for a shorter collar. The zipper on the G3 now has a comfort placket behind it, and is reinforced at the bottom of the zipper.
  • Conventional cuff with velcro closure - the cuff has been changed from the Gen 1 engineered cuff that extended past the wrist to a conventional cuff with velcro tab closure. Crye found that users found the engineered cuffs difficult to fold back and roll up, due to their shape, and preferred a conventional cuff. The velcro tab on the G3 has been reversed from the AC - it's now on the inside of the wrist instead of outside.
  • Heavy gauge size B and F Bonded Nylon thread used throughout which exceeds military standards for garment production. Made in accordance with Fed Spec.VT-295 type II

AC and G3


Collar details
  • Double layer bicep pocket with velcro closure - The 7" x 6" bicep/sleeve pocket is slanted at an angle for easier access. It is divided into two full size compartments (the outer compartment opening is staggared slightly) and has a bellows on the back for it to expand. The flap has angled corners . A small Crye Precision printed ribbon is sewn at the bottom corner of the left pocket, which is another hurdle for knock-off companies to overcome. All G3 garments so far have this mark for authenticity.
  • Flexible Velcro configuration - Instead of the normal large velcro field on the outside of the pocket, there are instead two vertical 5" x 1.5" segments. By having two segments vs. one large piece, the pocket remains more flexible and less bulky. Patches can either straddle the velcro strips, or smaller ones can be placed on one segment or the other.
  • Pen pocket and eye-pro holder - The left bicep pocket has a pen pocket along the front edge and both pocket flaps have a small slot in the top for hanging eye protection/sunglasses by inserting one of the temples into the slot.
  • Elbow reinforcement with pad pocket - Instead of the semi-rigid exposed elbow pad seen on the Gen I and AC Combat Shirts, the G3 elbow has the same elbow pocket as on the field shirt, with no opening for a elbow cap. I miss the distinctive look of the exposed cap, but it was decided that it wasn't critical on the elbows and saved a bit of weight. It still provides resistance to abrasion and accomodates the optional shaped Crye Field shirt elbow pad.
  • Available sizes are XS-3XL in Short, Regular, Long and Extra Long lengths. Available colours are Crye MultiCam, Khaki 400, Ranger Green and Black.

Bicep pocket - AC and G3


Eye-pro holder & pen pocket

Double layer bicep pocket

Elbow - AC and G3

Elbow pad pocket

 

G3 Combat Pants

When the G3 Combat Pants debuted at the 2010 SHOT show (but weren't released until June 2011), the question that most people asked, including myself, was 'what's the difference between the G3 and the Combat Pant AC? It's in the details, really, and the AC is no less viable now than it was when it was first introduced. The G3 is more an evolution of the design with improvements, rather than a drastic change from the AC, and is also intended as a no-compromise assault uniform; aggressively cut for maximum mobility. The G3, like the Combat pants AC ere designed to fit a wider range of missions with light weight as a main design driver. They're not only almost as light as standard BDU pants, and when used with the optional integrated joint protection are lighter than a BDU pant/separate knee pad combo.

The G3 Combat Pants are available in even waist sizes 28 through 46 in short, regular, long and extra long lengths. They come in Crye Multicam and Khaki 400, both shown here, and Ranger Green or Black. The Khaki 400 is a greyer shade than the Sand used on the AC.

The G3 Combat Pant features are as follows, size 32 short shown:

  • Material - The Combat Pant AC base fabric is Crye's Mil-Spec 50/50 NYCO ripstop, which is both durable and light weight. It has 4-way stretch woven panels for flexibility/mobility in matching colours. The Combat Pants AC in MultiCam had solid colour stretch panels, but the G3 pants now have MultiCam stretch panels.
  • Unique low-profile waist adjustment system - This is one of the best new features on the G3 Combat Pants, as far as I'm concerned. All the Combat Pants come in 2" waist increments, but unless they're the perfect fit, a belt is required. The G3 pant has the best waist adjustment I've seen on a pant. A short length of 1" elastic is sewn inside the waist band, just behind the first belt loop. A short piece of webbing connects the elastic and a die cut rubberized velcro tab (like the ones used on some jacket cuff adjustments). There's a loop velcro patch that's located between the second and third belt loops, to which the tab secures. It's very low profile and secure. No metal buckles, no slippage.
  • Velcro waist closure and zipper fly - A velcro tab instead of a button secures the waist for added adjustability. The waistband is lightly padded from the second belt loop back instead of all the way around like the AC. While the waist band on the AC pant was higher in the back, the waist band on the G3 is the same height all the way around. The six belt loops are 2" wide. The two front belt loops have a small loop at the bottom for attaching D-rings.
  • Rear stretch panel - At the back, right below the belt line is a 4-way stretch woven panel which allows the wearer to bend and squat without pulling the rear of the belt down.
  • Gusseted crotch - New on the G3 is a stretch diamond gusseted crotch using the same 4-way stretch woven fabric as the other stretch panels.
  • Double layer seat - The G3 now has a reinforced, double-layer seat whereas the AC has a non-reinforced seat.
  • Side-entry slash pockets - one on each hip. The entrance has less of an angle than on the AC.
  • Rear zipper pockets - The rear pockets are now zippered instead of flapped, for a cleaner apperance. The entrance is right below the stretch panel.

MultiCam

Khaki 400

Khaki G3 and Sand AC colour difference

Front details

Rear

Stretch-woven gusseted crotch
  • Front small thigh pockets - A small pocket is located on the front of the thigh above the knee. It's pleated so that it expands and is covered by a flap secured by velcro.
  • Knee pad height adjuster - The AC pants had a knee pad height adjuster located inside the front slash pockets, with a ladder lock for adjustment. The G3, instead, has a simpler set up consisting of a length of shock cord connecting the top of the knee and the front small thigh pocket, with a cord lock for adjustment. By pulling up on the shock cord, you raise the knee pad on the knee. I've never really had to use this feature, so if the cord lock in the pocket bothers you, you can always cut it off.
  • Knife/light holder - On each side, right below the front slash pocket, is a knife/light holder. This is separate from the slash pocket and opens up into the cargo pocket below.
  • Large side cargo pockets - These have double pleats plus rear bellows for a lot of expansion. They're also located a bit higher than on the AC for easier access. You can stuff quite a bit in these pockets. The pockets lay completely flat when empty, due to their 'concealed pleat' construction. The cargo pockets have a velcro-closed flap. Inside each pocket is a loop of elastic, for use as a water bottle or magazine stabilizer. It keep a water bottle or M4 magazine upright inside the pocket, rather than ending up at the bottom and flopping around.
  • Shaped leg construction - the Combat pants have a fully shaped leg construction for increased mobility. Enough material where it's needed, and none where it's not, and the panels are shaped and sewn to conform to the natural shape of the knee.


Side details

Waist adjustment

Knife/light holder

Front thigh pocket

Elastic in cargo pocket
  • Semi-rigid external knee protection and internal knee pad - The G3 is designed for use with the optional removable Airflex Combat Knee pads. The pad pocket on the knees retains the semi-rigid knee pad, with an external semi-rigid cap protecting the outside. The external cap has a non-slip surface. The pad slips through an opening in the front of the knee, and the pocket opening material is sandwiched around the internal pad and the 'rim' of the external cap. Velcro lines the hole and further secures it to the pad. There's also a velcro tab on the side of each knee which snugs up the knee pad to the leg.
  • Built-in knee flap covers - When not using the Airflex knee pads, a built-in flap covers the kneecap opening. This is made of the 50/50 N"YCO fabric and protects the stretch woven liner inside. Before, on the AC, the knee pad openings were exposed.
  • Knee pad stretch panel - Like on the AC, the knee pad pocket is actually sewn on top of a 4-way stretch panel. This allows the pant above and around the knee pad to stretch when kneeling or bending the leg and prevents the pants cuffs from riding up. This feature gives you full range of motion at the knee without any binding or pulling of the fabric.
  • Calf/lower leg pockets - there is a pleated/expandable small pocket on the outside of each lower leg with a velcro flap closure.
  • Velcro lower leg closure - A velcro tab snugs the pants cuffs around the ankles.
  • Pocket details - All pocket flaps have angled corners for less snagging, and drain holes. On the external pockets, the drain holes are concealed in the pleats.

G3 and AC knees

Flap cover

Knee pads

Lower leg details

General observations - The fit of the G3 Combat shirt is more relaxed than the Combat Shirt AC, as you can see when you compare the photos of me wearing the G3, and the photos in the Combat Shirt AC review below. It's definitely not as form-fitting on me, but this of course depends on a person's 'form'. The torso driFIRE material feels like the fabric on the AC; very much like cotton but with better wicking and drying properties. Im glad to see the darker shade finally available for less contrast with the rest of the uniform.

As I mentioned above, The G3 Combat Uniform is more of an evolution of the AC, with detail 'tweaks', resulting in a more versatile garment. I do miss the the external joint protection on the elbows, as that was one of the most distinctive features of the Crye Combat shirt, but understand the reasons why they went to the field shirt elbow pocket configuration. Not everyone uses the Combat elbow pads with the Combat shirt, and if the elbow pad is left out of the Combat Shirt AC, this leaves the uncovered opening, though which dirt/debris can enter the sleeve. With the softer material of the field elbow pads, not much wear on the regular fabric elbow pockets was observed, so it just made more sense to go with the field shirt configuration. The added sunglass slot and pen slot in the bicep pocket is a simple yet useful feature.






The fit of the G3 Combat Pants feels about the same as the AC on me. One of the biggest differences in feel when wearing the G3 is the new diamond gusseted crotch stretch panel, especially when squatting or kneeling. You could do the splits in these pants in comfort, if you could do the splits. The stretch fabric is also less bulky and more comfortable in that region than regular fabric. The other significant feature is the low profile adjustable waist tabs. The die cut tabs can't be felt under a belt, unlike buckles, and the short length of elastic provides some 'give' in the waist for different positions, while keeping the waist snug. With the waist adjustment tabs, I don't have to wear a belt with the G3 pants. By far the best waist adjustment system I've seen on a pant.

The knee flap covers are also nice additions to the Combat Pants, as you can now wear the pants sans the combat knee pads without the exposed opening, protecting the stretch fabric inside from wear. I found that it's also possible to use the Field Knee Pads with the G3 pants, with the knee flap covers over them.

With the added features and detail improvements, the Crye Precision G3 Combat Uniform offers the user even more comfort, mobility and utility than the already excellent AC (which will be available while supplies last). In typical fashion, Crye raises the bar again.


 

 

 


Crye Precision "Gen 2" Combat Shirt and Pant AC

1/29/09 - It's been about four years since I previewed Crye Precision's groundbreaking Combat Uniform (Gen 1) in the previous writeup below, which featured a host of innovations not previously seen in a combat uniform. Since then, its influence can be seen in the new Army Combat Shirt and the USMC FROG2 Combat Shirt (produced by Crye).

The concept of the Gen 1 Combat Uniform was that is was designed to be worn with a soldier's full compliment of armour and equipment, and to provide the most protection for DA or more specialized missions. The Combat Shirt had a form fitting torso for comfort under body armour and vests, and the Combat Pants were heavily reinforced and loaded with features. While the Gen 1 Combat Shirt was extremely lightweight (even more so than a regular BDU top), the Gen 1 Combat Pant was relatively heavier due to the added padding, numerous features and cordura reinforcements. With the Gen 2 Combat uniform, officially designated the Combat Shirt AC and Combat Pant AC, revisions have been made to streamline the uniform with light weight as a major design driver while still providing integrated protection. Actually, the AC uniform is not simply a lightened version of the Gen 1; it's a different animal. The addition of stretch panels in key areas on the pants is a new feature which allows more mobility and range of motion than before while the pants have a completely new pocket layout. The 'Gen 2' label is misleading, as there have been a least a dozen versions of Crye's Combat Uniform, each one tailored to meet the requirements of the various customers. 'Gen 2' just refers to the second version commercially offered by Crye Precision. They are offered in MultiCam, Black, Sand and Green (close to ranger/smoke green).

Combat Shirt AC

When wearing body armour, a vest or chest rig, access to torso pockets is limited and normal BDU sizing tends to be on the looser side, causing bunching of excess material under the armour or gear. The Combat Shirt concept eliminates the torso pockets and bulk, instead replacing the entire torso with a streamlined, form fitting wicking material that provides the most comfort when worn under gear. The upper arm pockets provide storage while the integrated elbow pads offer greater protection with less weight than separate elbow pads.

Here's a summary of the features on the Combat Shirt AC, size medium shown:

  • Material - The Gen 1 Combat Shirt utilized a stretchy 'Underarmor'-type slick nylon material for the torso. Synthetic wicking base layers became popular in the Armed Forces as they provided comfort by transporting perspiration away from the skin to outer layers, keeping the user drier and more comfortable under most conditions. Back in April 2006, the Marines banned the use of polyester or nylon-based athletic clothing while conducting operations 'outside the wire' in Iraq (source). This was due to the danger of such clothing melting and fusing to the skin when exposed to extreme heat and flames, a concern for users who might be exposed to flash fires, flames or IEDs etc. The Combat Shirt AC torso now utilizes flame-resistant (FR) driFIRE modacrylic fabric. driFIRE uses dri-release® performance fabric technology produced by Optimer with Freshguard® odor control. dri-release® is moisture-wicking technology that combines wicking with fast-drying properties. While polyester/nylon-based garments will melt or drip when exposed to flame, driFIRE will not. It's not a flame-resistant treatment - the properties are inherent in the fabric and will not deteriorate over time. The sleeves and collar are made of Crye's 50/50 NYCO ripstop fabric.


Combat shirt, collar up

Collar folded over


Untucked
  • High, zipper collar - this can be worn up or folded over, open or closed.
  • Conventional cuff with velcro closure - the cuff has been changed from the Gen 1 engineered cuff that extended past the wrist to a conventional cuff with velcro tab closure. Crye found that users found the engineered cuffs difficult to fold back and roll up, due to their shape, and preferred a conventional cuff.
  • Upper arm pockets with velcro panel and closure - the Gen 1 flight-suit style pockets have been replaced with larger, more roomy bellows pockets similar to the R6 Field Shirt. Instead of loop velcro ID patch covering the entire sleeve pocket, there are now two patches - one on the pocket flap, and another on the pocket itself . The lower patch is partially covered by the flap as it serves as the flap closure, so the effective area exposed is 3.5" x 4". I like the larger pockets of the AC more than the Gen 1, as I think they add more utility.
  • Heavy gauge size B and F Bonded Nylon thread used throughout which exceeds military standards for garment production. Made in accordance with Fed Spec.VT-295 type II
  • Removable joint protection - like the Gen 1 Combat Shirt, the AC offers joint protection with a molded/shaped pad covered in nylon fabric, with an additional semi-rigid cap attached to the pad, which is exposed to the outside of the sleeve through an opening in the elbow reinforcement/pad pocket. The pad is inserted from the outside through the opening in the elbow pocket, which has internal velcro, which further secures the pad. An elastic forearm strap that is connected to the elbow pad can be adjusted to keep the elbow pad snug against the arm to prevent shifting or rotation.
  • The Crye Range vest can be worn over the Combat Shirt to provide pockets and protection when armour is not worn.

Collar detail

Sleeve

Pocket and elbow pad

Knee and elbow pads

Elbow pads

Knee pads

 

 

Combat Pant AC

The first thing I noticed about the Combat Pant AC was how light weight it is. This is in contrast to the Gen 1 Combat Pants, which weighed more than regular BDU pants because they were built to provide superior protection for direct action/door kicking missions and were constructed out of the heavier twill, had cordura reinforcements and extra layers, and were loaded to the brim with features. The Combat pants AC were designed to fit a wider range of missions with light weight as a main design driver. They're not only almost as light as standard BDU pants, but have integrated joint protection and are lighter than a BDU pant/separate knee pad combo.

Some of the notable features of the Gen 1 pants have been eliminated on the AC, for weight savings. The Cordura is gone from the knees, shins/calves and ankles; so is the waste management flap (poop flap) and the full length side zippers. The pocket configuration is also a bit more conventional with added utility.

The Combat Pant AC features are as follows, size 32 short shown:

  • Material - The Combat Pant AC is constructed of Crye's 50/50 NYCO ripstop fabric, which is both durable and light weight.
  • Sizing - The Combat Pant AC comes in 2" waist increments for a better fit - instead of going with the S, M, L etc sizing with adjustable waist. There is no adjustment or elastic in the waistband, and it's meant to be worn with a BDU belt. I felt that waist sizing was relatively true to size - maybe about one inch looser than marked.
  • Velcro waist closure and zipper fly - A velcro tab instead of a button secures the waist for added adjustability. Like the Gen 1, the waistband is lightly padded and is higher in the back for comfort when wearing a stiff belt. The five belt loops are no longer 500D cordura, but are of the same ripstop fabric and are now 2" wide instead of 2.75". Each belt loop has a small loop at the bottom for attaching D-rings
  • Rear stretch panel - At the back, in the area of your sacrum, right below the belt line is a stretch panel of Tweave fabric. This allows the wearer to bend and squat without pulling the rear of the belt down. Er, an "anti-plumber's crack" feature, if you will.
  • Side-entry slash pockets - one on each hip.
  • Rear flap pockets - Ah, these are what I missed on the Gen 1 Combat Pants. These are deep, roomy, and internal (not patch pockets). The slanted flaps are secured with a velcro patch.
  • Front small thigh pockets - A small pocket is located on the front of the thigh above the knee. It's pleated so that it expands and is covered by a flap secured by velcro.
  • Large side cargo pockets - These have double pleats plus rear bellows for a lot of expansion. You can stuff quite a bit in these pockets. By the way, all pockets lay completely flat when empty, due to their 'concealed pleat' construction. The cargo pockets have a velcro-closed flap.
  • Shaped leg construction - the Combat pants have a fully shaped leg construction for increased mobility. Enough material where it's needed, and none where it's not, and the panels are shaped and sewn to conform to the natural shape of the knee.
  • Semi-rigid external knee protection and internal knee pad - This is essentially the same setup as on the Gen 1 Combat Pant. A pad pocket on the knees retains the semi-rigid knee pad, with an external semi-rigid cap protecting the outside. The external cap has a non-slip surface. The pad slips through an opening in the front of the knee, and the pocket opening material is sandwiched around the internal pad and the 'rim' of the external cap. Velcro lines the hole and further secures it to the pad. It's been redesigned and is easier to remove and replace than the Gen 1, and can also be left in the pants for laundering. The Gen 1 knee pad pocket was constructed out of 500D cordura, but on the AC it's the same fabric as the rest of the pants. They found that with the Gen 2 knee pads, which were a more compliant fabric-covered foam instead of the hard shell plastic, there was less wear on the pad pocket from stones and rocks, as the foam would comply instead of resist. Hence, the cordura wasn't needed.
  • Knee pad stretch panel - The knee pad pocket is actually sewn on top of a Tweave stretch panel. This allows the pant above and around the knee pad to stretch when kneeling or bending the leg and prevents the pants cuffs from riding up. This feature gives you full range of motion at the knee without any binding or pulling of the fabric.


Waist front

Waist rear

Side pockets

Knee pad pocket

Knee pad installed

Calf pocket
  • Adjustment for knee pad - The Gen 1 Combat Pants had two adjustments for the knee pads; one for height on the knee, and another to snug the pads to the knee. For height, the Gen 1 had an external strap that ran in front of the cargo pockets. This strap supported the weight of the knee pad and could be adjusted so it'd sit at the correct height on the knee. The Combat Pant AC has a completely different setup. It's completely internalized and has an adjustable suspension strap that is accessed inside the side slash pockets. Instead of the Gen 1 internal elastic straps around the back of the knees that snugged the pads to the knee, the Gen 2 has an external velcro tab, so adjustments can be made on the fly. The tab doesn't have to be tight - just snug enough to keep the knee pad against the knee to prevent shifting or rotation. One of the reasons for being able to simplify the kneepad tensioner was that the new pads are light enough that they can be worn loose or tight as user preference dictates without needing a beefy means of holding them in place; lighter kneepads meant they needed less help staying where you want them, and they bend much easier. Generally if it's really hot, some users run them loose and report no issues with them stay in place when taking a knee, while others prefer to keep everything tight and secure no matter what.
  • Calf/lower leg pockets - there is a pleated/expandable small pocket on the outside of each lower leg with a velcro flap closure.
  • Velcro lower leg closure - A velcro tab snugs the pants cuffs around the ankles.
  • All pocket flaps have angled corners for less snagging, plus I think they look good.




Airflex Combat Knee Pad - The AirFlex Combat Kneepad features a vented design to improve cooling along with a relieved edge for greater mobility. It features a new flexible cap for complete freedom of movement. They conform to the shape of the knee better than the legacy knee pads (both shown below) and an additional level of comfort.




General observations - As mentioned above, the waste management flap and full length side zippers have been deleted for weight savings . I did like the side zippers as they could be used for ventilation on a hot day. But since the Combat Pant AC is lighter and not quite as warm, I won't miss the zippers too much. I've been using the Combat Shirt and Pants AC for the past eight months and like them very much.

I prefer the more 'natural' feel of the Combat Shirt AC torso driFIRE material to the slicker Gen 1. The driFIRE fabric feels very much like cotton, but with better wicking and drying properties. The larger shoulder pockets are also a plus. The Gen 1 flight-suit style pockets were a bit small in order to keep a low profile, but if a low profile is really needed on the AC, you don't have to put anything in the pockets and they'll lay flat. I was at the range on a warm day in full armour, and I felt as comfortable as I'd have expected to be. The tall collar protected my neck from hot brass burns more than once.

The Combat Pant AC doesn't feel any heavier than regular BDU pants, and they're noticeable lighter than the Gen 1 Combat Pants. The extra weight of the Gen 1 pants were more apparent when holding them. When wearing them, it was much less noticeable as the weight was distributed. The AC pants do give up a little bit to the Gen 1 in terms of protection against bumps and knocks in the lower leg area, as the Gen 1 Pants were thicker and had cordura reinforcements, but on the other hand their light weight and more conventional pocket layout make them suitable for a wider role besides DA. The integrated semi-rigid joint protection on the elbows and knees are much lighter, less bulky, and much more comfortable than a separate set of elbow and knee pads. There are no external straps to adjust, snag or come loose. You'll still get hot under the knee pads, though, but they work well.




In summary, the Crye Precision Combat Uniform AC is an updated, lightened and more streamlined version of the Gen 1 Combat Uniform introduced three years ago - the result of numerous iterations and feedback from users. In my opinion, it sets yet another standard in innovation and features for advanced battle garments.




 



With Crye Range vest

 

 


Crye Precision Combat Shirt and Combat Pants (Gen I)


Crye Combat Shirt and Combat Pants, overview.

Crye's Combat Shirt and Combat Pants are their more specialized articles of clothing, designed more for DA (Direct Action) than general use. Again, let me start by saying a big 'Thank You' to Crye for the opportunity to preview these just before they came out. Some pre-orders should be shipping out at the time of this writing. Visit Crye Precision for more information.

Meant to be worn in conjunction with body armour, the 'A-line' Combat Shirt and Pants include semi-rigid joint protection on the elbows and knees for operation in MOUT or close quarters, where those parts of the body are always prone to getting bashed.



Crye Combat Shirt

The Combat Shirt, as mentioned above, was intended to be worn under body armour. When worn over regular BDUs, an armoured vest usually limits the utility of the pockets on the chest or torso, while the seams and extra bulk of a loose-fitting BDU top might prove to be uncomfortable. The Combat Shirt streamlines the torso area by eliminating torso pockets (which provides more comfort under the armour) and more protection has been added to the elbows than a normal BDU top.

  • High, zipper collar - this can be worn up or folded over, open or closed.
  • Moisture-wicking fabric torso - Made of 81% Performance Polyester and 19% Elastine. The colour is an olive green, and the material is very soft and smooth to the touch. It's form fitting, and is donned pullover-style. An ultra-lightweight, non-itch American Merino wool torso version for cold weather will be available.
  • Engineered cuff with velcro closure - Like the Field Shirt, the cuffs extend past the wrist on the outside to provide some hand protection, and for a better fit. The inside part of the wrist is a bit shorter, and the cuff finds its 'natural' position and centers itself on the wrist.
  • Upper arm zip pockets - these are flight-suit style instead of the larger, bellows pockets of the Field shirt, for a lower profile when moving through doorways. The zipper opens to the front of the pocket, and there is a smaller, secondary pocket inside. A 5.5" x 4" velcro patch is sewn to the outside.
  • MIL-PRF-MCCUU 50% Nylon 50% Cotton lightweight twill sleeves
  • Heavy gauge size B and F Bonded Nylon thread used throughout which exceeds military standards for garment production. Made in accordance with Fed Spec.VT-295 type II
  • 500D Cordura elbow reinforcement for abrasion resistance
  • Removable joint protection - This is the same type of insert as used in the Field shirt, with an additional semi-rigid cap attached to the pad, which is exposed to the outside of the sleeve through an opening in the 500D elbow reinforcement. It has a slightly rubbery, non-slip surface. The pad is inserted from the outside through the opening in the elbow pocket, which has internal velcro, which further secures the pad. An elastic forearm strap can be adjusted to keep the elbow pad snug against the arm to prevent shifting or rotation.
  • Crye Range vest can be worn over the Combat Shirt to provide pockets and protection when armour is not worn.

The Combat Shirt really feels comfortable to wear - very cool and airy. There aren't any bulky pockets or folds of material to be felt when wearing load bearing gear or armour over it. I put my Paraclete RAV on to show the coverage over the Combat Shirt. The Crye Range Vest, when worn over the Combat Shirt, provides more storage than a regular BDU top has, and protects the torso material.



Front view

Rear quarter

Flat front-entry shoulder pockets

Joint protection and internal adjustment strap

Joint protection pad with adjustment strap

Closeup of the cuff and pad adjustment strap inside


Worn with a RAV

With Crye Range vest


Crye Combat Pants

The Combat Pant is arguably the most advanced and engineered article of clothing I've ever seen. Made of MIL-PRF-MCCUU 50% Nylon 50% Cotton heavyweight twill for hard wear, it's chock full features:

  • Like the Field pants, 2" waist increments for a better fit - instead of going with the S, M, L etc sizing with adjustable waist, There is no adjustment or elastic in the waistband, and it's meant to be worn with a BDU belt.
  • Velcro waist closure and zipper fly - A velcro tab instead of a button secures the waist. The very lightly padded waistband is higher in the back, and 500D bartacked cordura belt loops will accept 2.75" wide pistol belts. The thin padding really does make a difference in comfort when a stiff belt is worn. It doesn't 'dig' into your hips as much.
  • 2 large bellows cargo pockets - There aren't any normal side/slash pockets; all pockets are located below the pistol belt gear line to allow access when wearing a belt kit. The cargo pockets have a webbing-reinforced top, which provides some shape to the opening. The opening is closed by tucking the corner of the fold into the forward corner of the flap, which is sewn down in front, and snapping the buckle on the 3/4" tiedown strap. The strap not only serves to keep the pocket closed, it also provides support and height adjustment for the knee pads.
  • Deep bellows rear pockets located low and close to the side for easy access. These have the most unusual closure I've ever seen. Hard to describe, but easy to use, the top of the pocket sort of unfolds when you open it. It's then folded and tucked back under the flap (which secures one corner), and the flap closed, securing the pocket.
  • Like the Field pants, the Combat pants have a fully shaped leg construction for increased mobility. Enough material where it's needed, and none where it's not, and darts/tucks in the fabric to conform to the natural shape of the knee.
  • Semi-rigid external knee protection and internal knee pad - This works just like the one on the Combat shirt. A Cordura pad pocket on the knees retains the semi-rigid knee pad, with an external cap protecting the outside. The external cap has a non-slip surface. The pad slips through an opening in the front of the knee, and the pocket opening material is sandwiched around the internal pad and the 'rim' of the external cap. Velcro lines the hole and further secures it to the pad. It's not too hard to remove and replace, and can be left in the pants for laundering.
  • Internal adjustment for knee pad - Besides the cargo pocket tiedown strap, which also serves to support/adjust the height of the knee pads, there is an elastic strap behind the knee which can be shortened or lengthened to hold the knee pads closer to the leg. It doesn't have to be tight - just snug enough to keep the knee pad against the knee to prevent shifting or rotation.
  • 500D Cordura lower legs - the front of the legs from the knees and the back of the calves are made of 500D cordura for additional protection and durability.
  • Velcro lower leg closure - The pants are meant to be worn outside the boots, although I suppose they can be tucked in as well. The velcro lower leg closer snugs the bottom of the pants around the boots.
  • Full length heavy duty side zips - the pants unzip completely from the bottom of the leg to the hip (they can be opened from the top as well). In event of a zipper failure, eyelets for 550 cord are located along the length of the leg so that the legs can be laced up. The full length zipper makes it easier to adjust the internal knee pads straps, tie your boots, or provide a medic a means of accessing the leg without having to cut off the pants in case of wounds. The wounds can be dressed, and the pants leg zipped up again over the dressing.
  • Integrated waste management zipper - Basically, you can take a crap without having to doff your pants and gear. As shown below in the pictures (I have kept it civil by wearing some thermal underwear under my pants for illustration only), the zippered opening starts in the front, and works its way around to the back. Unzipping the flap allows access to do whatever you need to. No further explanation needed. Both this and the fly opening zipper pulls have rubber pull tabs. It's also easier if you unzip the side leg zippers from the top to aid in pulling your skivvies down.
  • Misc features - internal labels are located so they do not touch the skin, all pockets have drain holes and all stress points are bartacked.

    Like all of Crye Precision's other products, the attention to detail in the design of the Combat Pants is apparent. Surprisingly comfortable to wear yet extremely rugged feeling, a testament to the human engineering and thought put into the design of the pants. I'll update this writeup after I get to use these in the field.


Front overview

Side cargo pockets with tiedown strap closure

Full length side zips

Wearing thermals underneath to illustrate the 'waste management flap'.

Rear bellows pocket

Detail of shaped knee

Knee pad with external shell and pad pocket on pants

Internal pad adjustment strap

 


At the range

Wore the Crye Combat uniform out for a day of shooting - temperature was in the mid 70's and VERY dry. Wind was gusting 20-30 mph and really annoying when you wanted to keep steady. Earlier in the morning I donned the BSC Protective Body Armor Carrier (a Level III and plate carrier) over the combat shirt, with my STRIKE chest harness over it. Later on I just shot with the STRIKE gear. We ran through a bunch of drills including the IDPA classifier and the SOTG M4A1 qual course a couple of times, so it involved standing, kneeling and prone positions. The pants weren't as hot as I thought they would be, maybe because it was dry, and the knee and elbow pads really worked well. I didn't think twice about dropping to the knees and forward into prone with them. No shifting or binding whatsoever. The full length side zippers on the pants were great for ventilation during breaks, but really weren't needed much. The combat shirt was very comfortable during the 8 hours on the range under the gear - no seams or extra material under the gear where it wasn't needed. I'd like to see a version of the Combat shirt with the Field shirt shoulder pockets, though. I've been getting inquiries about the Crye cap in the photos - Crye had them at the SHOT show earlier this year, so I'm not sure if they're available for sale - please inquire with Crye. Also, this one was the only one done up with the logo - cuz I'm special :-)


With my STRIKE setup


The knee pads REALLY work well

The Motley Crew



Crye Precision MICH Helmet Cover


Crye's MICH cover is designed to fit the MSA/Gallet TC2000, or MICH (Modular Integrated Communications Helmet). I don't have a MICH on hand, but I found that a large cover fits my Canadian Forces Gallet helmet, so that's what's shown here. Note: Before anyone emails me to ask, I don't know if it'll fit any other helmets.


Velcro straps

Reinforced inside front

Velcro straps interfacing with velcro inside helmet

Rear pouch (note internal velcro)

Pouch flaps up to install goggle strap

The main features of the MICH cover are:

  • The fabric used is MIL-PRF-MCCUU 50% Nylon 50% Cotton heavyweight twill (same as the pants).
  • Comes in multiple sizes to fit the shell sizes of the MICH.
  • Reinforced front area can be cut to accomodate NVG mount. A rectangle of hypalon material is sewn on the inside of the front, to prevent the fabric from ripping if a hole is cut out.
  • Bellows rear pouch/pocket for counter weight or storage. IR patches can be stored inside on a strip of velcro. The pouch unsnaps at the bottom and flips up so the goggle strap can be routed under it.
  • Snap-secured goggle strap retainers on the sides.
  • Velcro for IR patches on top (4"x1.5"), back and sides (1"x1")
  • Tab loop on top for dummy cording NVGs
  • Holes/slots on the sides for insertion of natural camouflage

The MICH cover is secured to the helmet using double-sided velcro straps and by elastic shock cord in the seam. The MICH has hook velcro installed on the inside of the shell, to which the pads are attached (I switched out the suspension in my Canadian helmet to use the pad system). To install the cover, first remove the suspension pads. Loosen up the elastic shock cord (via the cord lock in the back) and slip the cover over the helmet, making small adjustments as necessary to ensure an equal amount of overlap around the rim. Tighten up the elastic shock cord and tuck the ends away. Fold over and pull each of the velcro straps, and attach them to the inside of the helmet. The pads are re-installed over the straps. That's it.


Front/rear view

Side view

With goggles

Crye Precision Cap


Crye's ballcap shares many of the same features as the other 'tactical caps' out there (like the MultiCam HSGI cap). Nice, rounded profile, velcro strap adjustment in the back, and loop velcro patches on the front and the top (the button is eliminated for comfort under hearing protection). But leave it to Crye to add a bit more utility - their 'VisorLites'™ feature. The underside of the bill is lined with soft, loop velcro fabric, for attachment of a small LED keychain light, which has hook velcro on one side. It's almost unnoticeable until you turn it on, and when you do, you've got a nice bit of hands-free light. Much better than holding the LED light in your teeth.


Top of cap and two cool Crye-designed T-shirts

Rear view

Velcro-lined bill and VisorLite™

Crye Precision Boonie Hat


Crye's long-awaited (it's been at least a couple of years since we first saw the prototypes) boonie hat is now available to the masses.


Side

Rear quarter

Interior

Sure-Fit tension cord

The main features of the Boonie Hat are:

  • MultiCam Ripstop (shown here) or Sand 50/50 NYCO fabric. This is Crye's new ripstop fabric.
  • 2.5" wide brim - just the right width. Provides enough shade without getting in the way.
  • Soft-Vent™ Crown - Instead of metal vents, the Crye Boonie has two 'Soft-Vents' on each side, made by overlapping layers of fabric. The layers are not sewn together at the opening, which vents the inside of the crown.
  • The hat is tapered from front to back - it's higher by 1" in the back than the front. It's a roomy, comfortable fit on my head. Note that some have said that the fit is a bit tight, so keep that in mind, especially after machine washing and drying. Since you can cinch it down, it might be better to get a larger size.
  • Sure-Fit™ tension cord - This is a length of elastic shock cord hidden inside the perimeter of the sweatband and coming out two gromments at the rear of the hat. The tension can be adjusted via the cord lock, to keep the hat more secure on your head during activities. I like this feature; I can make it just a little tighter for a custom fit and it's less likely to get blown off or slip off.
  • No-see-um mesh inside vent - This fine mesh keeps debris or creepy crawlies from getting to your head through the vents. Yes, they'll be trapped inside the hat behind the mesh, but you should be able to shake them out later through the vents. In theory, of course - I have not tried this, nor do I wish to.
  • 1.5" x 1.5" loop velcro square on top for IR IFF square
  • Matching loops around the crown - the loose loops around the crown are made from ripstop fabric sewn over to form the webbing and bar-tacked every 1.5".
  • Standard chin strap
  • Mil-Spec construction

It's a very comfortable (and adjustable) fit on my head. I didn't know if the vents would stay open when I put the hat on, but I found that I could just stick a finger down the opening after putting the hat on to open them up and they tend to stay that way. A perfect match for Crye's Gen 2 Field Uniform in Ripstop.


Front view

Side view

Rear

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