HOME

Medical/Emergency Kit Page 1 Page 2 Page 3

TO VIEW FULL SIZE IMAGES: USERNAME and PASSWORD are both "mm"

 

ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch - Fatboy

5/26/12 - The ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch is designed to hold their Vacuum Sealed ETA Trauma Kit, or the contents of the kit if the end user wants faster access to individual items. It's custom made for ITS Tactical by Zulu Nylon Gear.

Description - The ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch is a medium sized pouch designed to hold the contents of a trauma kit. Users can fill it with their own supplies or with the contents of one of ITS's ETA (Extermity Hemorrhage, Tension Pneumothorax, Airway Obstruction) vacuum sealed kits or tactical blowout kit. It's made by Zulu Nylon Gear, which has been providing high quality custom tactical nylon to military, law enforcement, and civilian customers from around the globe since 2007. All Zulu Nylon Gear products are sewn in Chicago, Illinois.

Rather than the usual box-shaped medical pouch, the ETA pouch is rounded at the top and bottom; which reduces its profile and gives it a more streamlined and unusual appearance. There are two vertical zippers on each side; the side 'wings' and main flap zip together to form the pouch. The pouch has a main flap that opens downwards with a quick pull of the red webbing handle, providing immediate access to the pouch's contents. The flap is also secured at the top with velcro, so that it can be closed in haste without zipping up the zippers.

There are two rows and two columns of webbing on the side wings for attaching other items or pouches. At the top of the main flap is a loop velcro field for ID patches. The ITS Med PVC Patch is shown here affixed to it. On the rear of the pouch is a molle grid of 5 rows of webbing x 3 columns. This fits on 3 rows x 3 columns of webbing on any molle platform. Two long malice clips are provided with the ETA pouch.

 


MultiCam pouch

Loop velcro field

Side

Rear panel

 

Features - Here's a list of manufacturer's features for the Trauma Kit Pouch

  • 500d Cordura Construction with 420d pack cloth interior
  • Mil-spec 550 Type III Paracord zipper pulls
  • Colour-matched velcro and webbing - the MultiCam pouch features Murdock Jacquard woven webbing and MultiCam velcro
  • All edges bound by binding tape
  • 2 rows x 2 colums of molle webbing on the sides - these can be used for mounting tourniquets, pouches, shear pouches or rescue hook pouches
  • 1" red webbing pull handle denotes medical supplies - this can be tucked inside if desired
  • Reverse zippers keep dust and dirt out
  • 2" x 4" exterior velcro field for patches
  • One main interior pocket and two smaller slot pockets on the sides
  • User-replaceable shock cord and ITW cordloc - this inside the main flap
  • Weight 4.2 oz
  • Approximate dimensions: 7" tall x 5.25" wide x 2.5" deep at the deepest point
  • Requires 3 columns x 3 rows of molle webbing to mount
  • Available in Black, Coyote Brown and Crye MultiCam
  • Made in the USA

As illustrated below, each of the side 'wings' can be unzipped and opened independently; for access to the vertical slot pockets inside, without opening the pouch completely. The inside of the pouch is organized into the main pocket, the two slot pockets on the wings, and the elastic shock cord inside the main flap. A length of 1" webbing is sewn down at 1" intervals inside the main flap. Elastic shock cord is laced through the loops. The shock cord can be shortened or lengthened via the ITW cord loc. The idea behind this is to create loops out of the shock cord for holding items.

Since the elastic shock cord loops are not a fixed size, the size and tension of each loop is going to depend on the size of the item it holds, as well as the other loops. It's a versitile system, but takes a bit more tweaking than sewn down loops. If you remove an item, the loops on the next item will become looser. I found that it works better to use every other elastic loop, instead of every loop, as the elastic isn't so likely to loosen as much. This will depend on the items you are holding there, of course. It's also easier to start out by loosening the elastic cord completely before starting to insert items, then adjust each loop afterwards and tighten the shock cord.

 


Side wing open

Inside

Carrying a sealed kit

Individual items

 

Attaching the ETA pouch - The ETA pouch comes with the Tactical Tailor Malice clips that we're all familiar with, for attaching it to molle-compatible platforms. It attaches via malice clips the normal way. If the user wants a medical pouch that's releasable, then it's worth taking a look at the Molly Stix from National Molding. Instead of flexible nylon straps, the Molly Stix are rigid plastic 'sticks' that are woven through the pouch and platform, with a locking feature that secures them at the top of the pouch.

The Stix have a camming lock that has hooks that bite into the webbing when locked. When the top of the lock is pulled forward, it snaps open, enabling it to be pulled out. The Molly Stix have a short length of cord attached to the hole; and pulling the cord forward (away from the platform) unlocks the Stix, and it can be pulled out, releasing the pouch from the platform. Like malice clips, they're not easy to quick-install on the go, though, and installing the pouch to the platform is easier when the pouch is empty. I think that they're a pretty neat idea, and work well in this application. I'd rather have a first aid pouch that can be quickly removed from the platform, personally. The cords do require a stiff tug on them before they unlock the mechanism. Note that the Molly Stix are inserted into the top row of the platform first, then the 2nd row of the pouch and so on. The Stix are 5" long and weigh 1.5oz per pair. For use with the ETA, I tied the cords together, per ITS's recommendation.


Molly stix

Unlocked and locked



Cords tied together

Notes/Observations - The ETA pouch offers the user some different options, to suit his intended use. Some users prefer a pouch that carries individual items arranged in different pockets. Others prefer one that releases or quick-detaches from the vest or plate carrier. There are pros and cons to all of them, but I think that the main objective is to gain immediate access to the contents; whether it is for use on someone other than yourself, or for others to use on you. Either way, I feel that the ability to detach the pouch from the platform is an important feature to have. With a fixed pouch, access to the contents can be difficult if you're lying on it, or injured on the side that it's mounted. A detachable pouch can be tossed to someone else to use as well; keeping the contents intact. I was a bit hesitant to do a writeup on a fixed pouch, but when I heard about the Molly Stix, it addressed my concern.

The ETA pouch can be configured as a fixed pouch (using malice clips), so mounting it for easy access to the contents is going to dictate that it's towards the front. An alternative is to use it to carry the sealed ETA Trauma Kit, and when needed, just pull the sealed bag out. That way, the pouch can be mounted anywhere it can be opened, and the sealed trauma kit pulled out and opened. Using the Molly Stix and configurating it as a releasable pouch allows you to pack it either way (with individual items or a sealed trauma kit) and detach it quickly from the platform. Even if you plan on using it as a fixed pouch, I'd use the Molly Stix. The only downside to the Molly Stix vs. a velcro-backed detachable pouch is that the velcro backed pouch will be easier to re-attach to the vest or rig. If the ETA pouch is detached and the contents used, the empty pouch can be stuffed into a pant cargo pocket.

Mounted toward the front, pulling the red webbing handle downwards opens up the pouch quickly and allows access to all the contents. There's very little danger of the contents falling out, as they're well secured inside the pockets and elastic. If for some reason, you need to move immediately, you can just close the flap quickly and engage the velcro at the top, without zipping up the zippers.

The curved top and bottom of the ETA give up some volume vs. a box-shaped pouch, but I think that the lower profile is worth it as it doesn't feel as bulky as a regular pouch. Plus, it fits exactly what it was designed for - ITS's ETA sealed trauma kits. Also keep in mind that you don't have to use it as a trauma kit/medical pouch (just tuck the red loop inside); it'll serve other functions as well. It's a well made and thought out pouch.

 


ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch - Tallboy

2/8/13 - ITS Tactical has revamped their medical lineup and introduced the ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch - Tallboy. The Tallboy is a narrower/taller version of their original ETA Trauma Kit Pouch (now called the 'Fatboy') and is designed to fit on two columns of PALS webbing. It holds their Tallboy Vacuum Sealed ETA Trauma Kit, or the separated contents of the kit if the end user wants faster access to individual items. It's custom made for ITS Tactical by Zulu Nylon Gear.

Description - If you've read the previous writeup on the ETA Trauma Kit Pouch, now called the 'Fatboy', some of the information in this writeup may sound repetitive, as the Tallboy shares the same design features as the Fatboy but is both narrower and taller. Like the Fatboy, the Tallboy is a medium sized pouch designed to hold the contents of a trauma kit. Users can fill it with their own supplies or with the contents of one of ITS's ETA (Extermity Hemorrhage, Tension Pneumothorax, Airway Obstruction) vacuum sealed kits or tactical blowout kit. The Tallboy is made by Zulu Nylon Gear, which has been providing high quality custom tactical nylon to military, law enforcement, and civilian customers from around the globe since 2007. All Zulu Nylon Gear products are sewn in Chicago, Illinois.

The Tallboy shares the same external shape as the Fatboy; rather than the usual box-shaped medical pouch, it's rounded at the top and bottom; which reduces its profile and gives it a more streamlined and unusual appearance. There are two vertical zippers; one on each side. The side 'wings' and main flap zip together to form the pouch. The pouch has a main flap that opens downwards with a quick pull of the webbing handle, providing immediate access to the pouch's contents. The flap is also secured at the top with velcro, so that it can be closed in haste without zipping up the zippers. The original ETA Trauma Kit Pouch had a pull handle made of red webbing. Both the new Fatboy and Tallboy now have colour-matched pull handles, but with a piece of red velcro one-wrap around it. This was a stroke of genius, in my opinion, and allows the user to remove it if desired for a lower profile.

There are two rows and two columns of webbing on the side wings for attaching other items or pouches. At the top of the main flap is a loop velcro field for ID patches. The ITS Med PVC Patch is shown here affixed to it. On the rear of the pouch is a molle grid of 5 rows of webbing x 2 columns. This fits on 3 rows x 2 columns of webbing on any molle platform. There's also vertical webbing at the ends of the pouch, which allow the Tallboy to be mounted horizontally with two short malice clips. Two long and two short malice clips are provided with the Tallboy pouch. Like on the Fatboy illustrated in the writeup previously, each of the side 'wings' can be unzipped and opened independently; for access to the vertical slot pockets inside, without opening the pouch completely.

 


Fatboy (L) and Tallboy (R)




Removable red velcro

Side view

 

Features - Here's a list of manufacturer's features for the ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit Pouch - Tallboy

  • 500d Cordura Construction with 420d pack cloth interior
  • Mil-spec 550 Type III Paracord zipper pulls
  • Colour-matched velcro and webbing - the MultiCam pouch features Murdock Jacquard woven webbing and MultiCam velcro
  • All edges bound by binding tape
  • 2 rows x 2 colums of molle webbing on the sides - these can be used for mounting tourniquets, pouches, shear pouches or rescue hook pouches
  • Webbing pull handle with red velcro one-wrap denotes medical supplies. The velcro can be removed if desired
  • Reverse zippers keep dust and dirt out
  • 4" tall x 2.5" wide exterior velcro field for patches on main flap
  • One main interior pocket and two smaller slot pockets on the sides
  • User-replaceable shock cord and ITW cordloc - this inside the main flap
  • Weight 5 oz
  • Approximate dimensions: 9" tall x 3.5" wide x 2.5" deep at the deepest point
  • Requires 2 columns x 3 rows of molle webbing to mount vertically, and 5 columns x 2 rows of molle webbing to mount horizontally
  • Includes 2 long and 2 short malice clips, and the ITS Med PVC patch
  • Available in Black, Coyote Brown and Crye MultiCam
  • Made in the USA

The inside of the pouch is organized into the main pocket, the two slot pockets on the wings, and the elastic shock cord inside the main flap. The main pocket is sized to fit the vacuum packed ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit - Tallboy. The two wing pockets can store decompression needles and NPAs, or other airway devices.

A length of 1" webbing is sewn down at 1" intervals inside the main flap. Elastic shock cord is laced through the loops. The shock cord can be shortened or lengthened via the ITW cord loc. The idea behind this is to create loops out of the shock cord for holding items.

Since the elastic shock cord loops are not a fixed size, the size and tension of each loop is going to depend on the size of the item it holds, as well as the other loops. It's a versitile system, but takes a bit more tweaking than sewn down loops. If you remove an item, the loops on the next item might become looser. I found that it works better to use every other elastic loop, instead of every loop, as the elastic isn't so likely to loosen as much. This will depend on the items you are holding there, of course. It's also easier to start out by loosening the elastic cord completely before starting to insert items, then adjust each loop afterwards and tighten the shock cord.

 


Pull handle opens pouch



3 internal compartments

Main flap loops

Compressed gauze

 

Tallboy ETA Trauma Kit - The Tallboy pouch shown here is illustrated with the ITS Tactical ETA Trauma Kit (Tallboy). It combines the best items to treat the three leading preventable causes of death in the field (Extremity Hemorrhage, 60%, Tension Pneumothorax, 33%, and Airway Obstruction, 6%) in a vacuum sealed bag. The kit follows TCCC (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) Guidelines which are developed by USSOCOM to train non-medics to deal with the preventable causes of combat deaths. Note that ITS assumes no liability for the misuse of the ETA kit and recommends that you have the required training and authorizations to use the items inside.

The ETA Tallboy trauma kit is sold in three options - Basic, Standard and Mil/LE only. The Basic kit does not include the Decompression needle and NPA which the Standard kit does. Upgrading to the Mil/LE kit exchanges the QuikClit Z-fold Combat Gauze LE to Z-fold Combat Gauze (w/X-ray detectable Strip - Green package).

Description - The ETA Tallboy trauma kit's contents are vacuum packed in a heavy duty poly bag that features an integrated zip-loc closure. This is to enable the unused contents to be secured for future use. The poly bag has starter tear marks on each side of the bag above the zipper closure to aid in opening. A vacuum sealed kit ensures the sterility of the enclosed items in a water and moisture-proof, compact package. Each ETA kit has a minimum three-year shelf life when kept sealed. The Tallboy kit is sized to fit in the Tallboy pouch, or any pouch of similar shape and size.

The Tallboy sealed ETA kit measures approximately 8" long x 3.5" wide x 2.25" thick, and was sized to fit into a double M4 mag pouch. It fits, but tight, and I found that it'd fit more comfortably in an EMDOM double AK mag pouch. It's compact enough to stick in a range bag, EDC pack, or in your kit.

Contents - (for full descriptions, please visit ITS's page).

  • QuikClot Combat Gauze LE (1) - Quikclot Combat Gauze is impregnated with a hemostatic agent to treat life-threatening hemorrhage, stopping arterial and venous bleeding in seconds. It has no heat signature and it's easy to pack into any size wound. It can also be removed easily, unlike granular hemostatic agents. It can also function as a regular gauze for normal gauze applications. It's individually wrapped in a Z-fold format for easy packing of the wound.
  • MojoDart Decompression needle (1) - This is a 14 gauge 3.25" long decompression needle for treating a tension pneumothorax by inserting the needle into the 2nd intercostal space in the midclavicular line. It comes in a plastic tube to ensure sterility of the packaging and to prevent it from poking other items in the kit.
  • NPA (Nasopharyngeal Airway (1) - A 28 French Diameter Rusch MPA is included for use on a semiconscious or unconscious patient to secure an open airway. It features an adjustable ring that allows it to be sized for the patient and acts as the flared end to prevent it from sliding down the nasal cavity.
  • Nitrile gloves (1 pair) - Defender-T Nitrile Gloves in olive drab.
  • HALO Chest Seal (2) - The HALO Chest Seal/Dressing is used primarily as an occlusive dressing to treat a pneumothorax or penetrating chest wound. It can also be used to hold a bandage in place after packing a wound.
  • Pressure dressing (1) - The 4" Israeli Battle Dressing is primarily used as a pressure dressing to stop hemorrhage and achieve hemostatis. It is sterile and non adherent, and consolidates a primary dressing, pressure applicator, secondary dressing and closure apparatus to secure the bandage in place. It can be self-applied with one hand and can also be used as a field expedient tourniquet.
  • Z-fold dressing (1) - This replaces the H&H rolled compressed gauze. It's the EZ-Gauze from Tytek Medical and is a single 4.1 yd length of 6-ply, 4.5 sterile compressed gauze.
  • Elastic bandage (1) - 2" wide elastic bandage (ACE wrap). The wrap can be used to stabilize a sprain, support and injury (splint) or as an additional pressure dressing.
  • Combat Casualty Card (1) - The casualty card is used to mark what type of care has been provided, triage status/priority, and other patient information for higher echelon care.
  • Lubricating jelly (1) - 2.7g package of Surgilube for the NPA.
  • Pencil (1)

While geared towards combat casualty care, the ETA trauma kits aren't just meant for those who are expecting to go into 'combat'. Folks who work in law enforcement or security fields that might need to help stabilize patients with gunshot wounds, or civilians at firearms training classes (or just at the range) can benefit from having a kit on hand. Treatable injuries are not limited to incidents involving firearms or combat situations - some of these injuries can occur in auto accidents, at construction sites etc.

Proper training/knowledge beyond basic first aid is recommended for the use of some of these items, as with any medical product. Even if you don't have the training to use this kind of kit on an injury victim, it may be used by someone who knows what they're doing to save YOUR life, if you end up being the victim. By the same token, someone else who's present might have the know-how to use the contents of your trauma kit to stabilize a victim other than youself. In any case, it doesn't hurt to have one with you and the ITS ETA trauma kits make it all the more convenient.

 


Tallboy ETA kit in Tallboy pouch


Side slot pockets

Thickness of Tallboy trauma kit

Fits in an EMDOM double AK mag pouch

 

Attaching the ETA Tallboy pouch - The ETA Tallboy pouch comes with the Tactical Tailor Malice clips that we're all familiar with, for attaching it to molle-compatible platforms. It attaches via malice clips the normal way. The Tallboy comes with two long and two short malice clips for mounting it vertically or horizontally. If the user wants a medical pouch that's releasable, then it's worth taking a look at the Molly Stix from National Molding. Instead of flexible nylon straps, the Molly Stix are rigid plastic 'sticks' that are woven through the pouch and platform, with a locking feature that secures them at the top of the pouch. Note that the Molly Stix only work for the vertical mounting option for the Tallboy.

The Tallboy is shown below, mounted vertically on a belt, and horizontally on a belt.


Vertical mounting




Horizontal mounting



Notes/Observations - Both the ETA Tallboy and Fatboy pouches offer the user different options to suit his intended use. Some users prefer a pouch that carries individual items arranged in different pockets. Others prefer one that releases or quick-detaches from the vest or plate carrier. There are pros and cons to all of them, but I think that the main objective is to gain immediate access to the contents; whether it is for use on someone other than yourself, or for others to use on you. Either way, I feel that the ability to detach either the pouch from the platform or the contents is an important feature to have. With a fixed pouch, access to the contents can be difficult if you're lying on it, or injured on the side that it's mounted. A detachable pouch can be tossed to someone else to use as well; keeping the contents intact. An alternative is to use it to carry the sealed ETA Trauma Kit, and when needed, just pull the sealed bag out. That way, the pouch can be mounted anywhere it can be opened, and the sealed trauma kit pulled out and opened.

The ETA Tallboy pouch can be configured as a fixed pouch (using malice clips), so mounting it for easy access to the contents is going to dictate that it's towards the front if the contents are separated inside. Using the Molly Stix and configurating it as a releasable pouch (vertical configuration only) allows you to pack it either way (with individual items or a sealed trauma kit) and detach it quickly from the platform. Even if you plan on using it as a fixed pouch, I'd use the Molly Stix. The only downside to the Molly Stix vs. a velcro-backed detachable pouch is that the velcro backed pouch will be easier to re-attach to the vest or rig. If the ETA Tallboy pouch is detached and the contents used, the empty pouch can be stuffed into a pant cargo pocket.

Mounted toward the front, pulling the red webbing handle downwards opens up the pouch quickly and allows access to all the contents. There's very little danger of the contents falling out, as they're well secured inside the pockets and elastic. If for some reason, you need to move immediately, you can just close the flap quickly and engage the velcro at the top, without zipping up the zippers. Mounted horizontally on the belt at the back, the Tallboy pouch fills up that space under the rear plate when wearing a plate carrier. The pouch is easily opened, but I'd highly recommend that the the trauma kit be left in its bag, so it can be extracted as a whole.



As mentioned before, it doesn't take up much more space than a double M4 mag pouch on the belt. Also keep in mind that you don't have to use it as a trauma kit/medical pouch; it'll serve other functions as well. If you like the Fatboy, I'm sure you'll like the Tallboy. Good stuff - well made and designed.

 

ATTENTION! PLEASE DO NOT LINK DIRECTLY TO MY IMAGES -
IT IS A COPYRIGHT VIOLATION.


/ . PLEASE OBSERVE AND RESPECT OUR COPYRIGHT! . /
©opyright by MilitaryMorons.com. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction, Duplication, Distribution Strictly Prohibited.

Unless mentioned otherwise, content and images are the property of militarymorons.com and are not in the public domain.
They are not to be used without permission. Please Contact me for permission to use any images or content herein.